Greetings to all Virtual Convention Attendees!

I know I am not the only one who has missed going to conventions this year. I have really missed getting out and seeing all the fandoms come together to celebrate past legends and future expectations. I hope some of you have gotten the chance to participate in a virtual con. If so, my wish is that you enjoy the expereince! I know shoping online is not as much fun as browsing the Dealer Room, but I hope you still find something you like.
As a lover of Dealer Room deals, I want to offer all lovers of fantasy books this discount coupon for my store for the rest of 2020.
Just enter code CON2020 at check out for a special discount!
See you next year!

 

CON2020 discount code valid for online purchases 9/10/2020 - 12/31/2020.

 

 

 

Welcome to Avio Publishing!


I assume you’re here because you love books, love writing, or want to know more about publishing. I can positively say that you have come to a place of learning. Will I be able to help you? I hope so. Will I have the answer to every question? There are too many questions in the universe for one person to have every answer; however, I am sure that if I don't know the answer already, I can find the answer to your publishing questions. Authors and Independent publishers have a strong community. I found the answers to my past questions by delving into the industry and talking with others who have been working in the writing field for many years. I know that my future questions will find answers as well. I would be glad to share what I have learned along my publishing journey. My goal is to be able to help other authors find the answers they need, provide assistance in publishing written works, and to help those written works find the readers they deserve.


That being said, the writing industry is not a get rich quick scheme. It is not easy to write books and make money, it is a lot of work. No matter who you publish with, be it small, independent, or traditional, the real work of getting your written works to readers falls on you, the author. If you have the finances, you can hire marketers and publicists, but it is not the responsibility of the publisher to provide these services. The job of the publisher is to coordinate between the author and the makers and sellers of books. The makers include off-set printers, print-on-demand (POD) printers, cover designers, illustrators, proofreaders, book interior designers, and content editors. The sellers include wholesalers and distributors. The publisher is responsible for getting the proper ISBN’s and sales information to the sellers. As such, the publisher is putting their name on your written work, their stamp of approval, and they may ask for edits to be done to make the written work the best it can be. Getting people interested in the written work, finding fans and readers, is the responsibility of the author.

Why is that the case? It wasn’t always this way. Not so long ago the general public came to the big publishers to find the next best books. The traditional publishers name was the best advertising an author could have. Readers trusted the big publishers to have the best, and the big publishers put out catalogs of new works for people to learn about and order books. Now the marketing world is very different. Readers can go online and find millions of titles. In 2015, over a million new titles were listed on Amazon. Some of those works are great some are not. New books and new authors are everywhere and readers are not limited to the traditional publisher catalogs for information. However, with such an abundance of information and accessibility, many authors get lost in the masses. Today, if an author is lucky enough to get an agent and a traditional publisher to sign on with a manuscript, the author has to show a marketing plan as well. The author has to prove to the publisher that there are already lots of readers waiting for the book to be published. If not, the traditional publisher is not willing to put money into a project with a high amount of uncertainty. Traditional publishers are out to make money, bottom line.

Independent and small publishing companies are more willing to take risks on new authors. However, most of these companies do not have the existing fan base or financial support to provide a high amount of marketing and publicity for each and every book. Therefore those responsibilities fall back to the author. Whatever path you choose to follow, the work of finding fans is yours for one more reason. The readers. The readers don’t care about the publishing company, they want to see the face that created the written work. The readers love to know more about the author, not the behind-the-scenes people or the make-it-happen people. The readers want to connect to the author.

One of the best parts of today’s publishing avenues, is that any work, any author, can get published. Not all authors are out to get rich, and for those authors it is much easier to accomplish their goals. It is possible to take a finished manuscript and have it published in much shorter time than just a few decades ago. With print-on-demand capabilities, an author can have a professionally printed, high quality book to sell or give away to friends and family in less than a month. Traditional publishers can take years to go from manuscript to finished book, but that is no longer the case for independent and self publishing. For the price of printing and shipping, any author can self publish a book.

There is a dark side to the writing industry, as well, and every author needs to be aware of the false allure of author predators. These companies look legitimate, and many may claim links to or have one of the traditional publishing companies as a parent company, but beware. These companies claim to be able to make your manuscript into a best seller, for only an up-front fee. This is where these companies make their money. The author uploads their files, pays the fee, and then something else is needed, for an additional fee. Then something else is needed, then the next stage has more services that need to be done, again with more fees. Many authors who have tried these companies struggle for months or years, spending more and more money, and never get a finished published book for it. I almost fell into the trap myself, and was lucky enough to avoid making that final commitment. Now I won’t tell you I haven’t spent money on my books, and I will encourage you to do so as well, but I want you to be sure to read the contracts carefully. Pay only for necessary services rendered, not for empty promises.

Read more about author predators here:
http://www.indiesunlimited.com/2015/03/05/how-to-avoid-publishing-predators/

http://thebookshepherd.com/authors-judgment-and-publishing-predators.html

https://www.thebookdesigner.com/2017/03/beware-of-sharks-in-publishers-clothing/

On a final note, I wish you all the best of luck in achieving your publishing goals. If you were just here for the books, well then, I hope you enjoy what I have to offer.

Issa Mullin
Avio Publishing, LLC Owner and Sci-Fi/Fantasy Author

Avio Publishing is a small independent publisher. Currently I have only my own works to publish. I would be happy to consult with you on your own publishing journey and help you find the best path for you to achieve your goals. Writers of all types and genre are welcome to connect with me at issamullin[at]aviopublishing[dot]com. Consultation is free. Fees for services rendered will be determined at time of agreement.

Avio Publishing recommended author resources:
http://thebookshepherd.com/

http://www.indiesunlimited.com/

https://www.thebookdesigner.com/

http://northerncoloradowriters.com/

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs